Category Archives: Bird

FRUITS AND VEGGIES : WHAT IS SAFE AND WHAT ISN’T FOR OUR DOGS.

INTRODUCTION

Several foods that we found in our fridges and pantries should never be given to our dogs. On the other hand, many familiar foods can be offered to them. What are they? That’s what we’re going to see today.

This blog will mainly focus on dogs, as they are most likely to eat all sorts of things, not to say anything! But when that is indicated, we will make a note regarding the food that should not be given to our cats, rabbits and birds.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

WARNING!

Beware, it is not because we recommend a fruit or a vegetable, that one must exaggerate in the quantity to give.  We are talking here about small pieces, mainly given as treats.

In some cases, we can give a little more, we will see.

Moreover, not all dogs are equal. Some will not tolerate certain fruits or vegetables, as they will cause vomiting. If this is the case, please abstain from giving those to your pet.berries-blueberries-raspberries-fruit-122442

So if we do not cause an imbalance in the diet of our dogs, the amount of vegetables and fruits should be less than 10% of its total diet. Moreover, at this amount, the risks of causing urinary problems in certain dogs predisposed to make stones in the bladder are almost nonexistent.

However, there may be restrictions if your dog is suffering from certain diseases, so talk to your veterinarian.

Popular fruits and vegetables that do not present problems:

-FRUITS

APPLES

OK. Apples are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, as well as fiber. They are low in protein and fat, making it a good treat for older dogs. Do not give the core because of the risk of suffocation.

BANANAS

Ok. But in very small quantities, because they are quite caloric.

Pieces of dried bananas can be given as treats for rabbits.

OK for birds, but in very small quantity.

WATERMELON

Ok. Very popular during summertime , small pieces can be given, but the bark and seeds must be removed.

OK for the birds.

SMALL FRUITS (Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)

Ok. In moderation for raspberries and strawberries because of the sugar. It is essential to wash the berries well before offering them.

Dehydrated strawberries can be offered sparingly to rabbits as a treat.

ORANGES AND CLEMENTINES

Ok. Without the skin and seeds.

Citrus fruits are excellent fruits to offer your birds

KIWI

Ok. Without the skin.

This is the best fruit to offer to your birds and guinea pigs (because of high content in Vitamin C).

-VEGETABLES

BROCCOLI

Ok. But in small quantities, as they may cause vomiting due to the isothiocyanates they contain, which may cause gastric irritation.

CUCUMBER AND CELERY

Ok. Very low in calories.

CARROTS

Ok. With moderation because of their sugar content.

TOMATO

Ok. IF only the fruit is offered and not the stem that contains solanine, which can be toxic when ingested in large quantities.

GREEN BEANS

OK. In limited quantities. Some dogs prefer them al dente!

Popular fruits and vegetables that should be avoided:

-FRUITS

GRAPES (and red currants)

NO! Grapes can cause acute kidney failure.

All types of products containing grapes or raisins (including grape juice, mixtures of nuts and dry fruits, bagels, etc.) can cause kidney failure. Even organic, pesticide-free, grapes grown in domestic gardens can cause toxicity. Although the mechanism of action is not clearly understood, these fruits may lead to anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and potentially severe acute renal failure (which develops several days later). Toxicity is not necessarily dose dependent, and symptoms may occur even with small ingestions.

CHERRIES

No. Even if the fruit itself is not toxic, the leaves, stems and pits are. They contain cyanide. However, the quantities are not high and the cores must be ground to release the toxic precursors.

Then, as a precaution, it is better to avoid them.

AVOCADO

No. The pit, skin and avocado leaves contain persin, a toxin that often causes vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. The fruit itself, does not have as much persin as the rest of the plant, but it is still has too much for dogs.

Very toxic to birds and rabbits. So avoid at all cost.

-VEGETABLES

KALE

No.  because very small amounts can cause vomiting in some dogs and we do not know why …

MUSHROOMS

No. Avoid wild mushrooms, there are too many that are toxic. Unless you are an experienced mycologist, be sure to stay clear of them. As for mushrooms sold commercially, white mushrooms would be OK and according to several mycologists, are the only ones that can be eaten raw in a safe way.

Precautionary principle: do not give mushrooms.

ASPARAGUS

No. not because they are toxic. Raw, they are too woody and difficult to chew and cooked, they are soft and have little food interest. This is not the best vegetable.

ONION, GARLIC, LEEK AND CHIVE

No. They may cause gastrointestinal irritation and may lead to red blood cell lesions: anemia.

Although cats are more sensitive, dogs are also at risk if a large amount is consumed. A small occasional dose, such as what can be found in pet foods or treats, will probably not be a problem, but as a precaution, we should not give them to our pets.

MACADAM NUTS

No. Macadam nuts are commonly used in many cookies and sweets. However, they can cause problems for your dog. These nuts can cause weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and fever in dogs. Signs usually appear within 12 hours of ingestion and last about 12 to 48 hours.

Useful links:

Pet Poison Helpline Poison Control Center

http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Online Web Store.

Did you know that you can now enjoy the benefits of home delivery of your pet’s prescription medications and diets, as well as a wide range of non-prescription items? We trust you will enjoy the ease of buying products and prescriptions for your pets on-line and the convenience of having them delivered right to your home. Our experienced and knowledgeable staff is ready to help you find the best health outcomes for your pet and we are committed to extending this service by delivering high quality, veterinarian-approved products right to your door.

Sign in now to re-order your pet products or to check the status of your order.e-commerce-402822_960_720

If you are a registered user, access your account by using the link provided in your re-order reminder email or by entering your login information into our sign-in box on this web page.

If you are new to our web store, please contact us and we will be happy to sign you up. Or click on the link on the left to let us know that you would like to register for a web store password.

Register to My Vet Store

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Feather picking in pet birds.

What is feather picking?

Feather picking is a behavior where the bird inflicts damage to itself by pulling  its own feathers thus creating skin wounds.

Why is my bird pulling its feathers?

 In all cases, food and living conditions should be modified when they are not optimal.

In all cases, food and living conditions should be modified when they are not optimal.

Pecking means the bird is uncomfortable, but it can also indicate a disease. There are a variety of causes for feather pecking, mostly all medical and/or  behavioral.

Medical causes Non-medical causes
– Inadequate environment (dust, smoke, etc) – Stressful environment
– Skin infection (bacteria, parasites, yeasts, viruses) – Lack of stimulation (boredom)
– Internal infection (bacteria, parasites, yeasts, viruses) -Lack of socialization
-Kyst -Anxiety
-Tumor -Lack if sleep
-Wound -Sexual behavior
-Abnormal feather growth -Molt
-Hypersensibility or irritation -Inadequate wing trim
-Other systemic problem
– Nutritional deficiency

 How to determine the cause?

The veterinarian should get as much information on the current and past living conditions of your bird to be able to discover the origins of the pecking condition. Often, tests are necessary to ensure that your bird is not fighting an infection or any other medical condition. X-rays, blood tests, droppings analysis and other tests may be needed.

How to eliminate this behavior?

If a medical problem is diagnosed, treatment will be prescribed to resolve the condition. In all cases, food and living conditions should be modified when they are not optimal. In some cases it will be necessary to install an Elizabethan collar around the neck of a bird to prevent it from continuing to hurt itself. Some birds suffering from anxiety can also receive medication. Recommendations adapted to the condition of your bird will be done.

How to stimulate my bird?

In nature, birds travel long hours every day and spend much of the day  foraging. They live in social groups and interact a lot with each other. It is when these natural needs to search and socialize are not met, that  a bird can redirect his energy on excessive grooming. For his psychological balance, you must keep the bird busy: it is enriching for him.

1- Make your bird work for his food: hide food in a ball of paper or in a cardboard box. Suspend food from a perch and keep inedible toys in his habitat.

2- Provide various toys. Offer alternate Toys: birds, like children,  get tired quickly of a toy they’ve had for a long time. Provide different colored toys,  with different textures and materials.

  1. Spend as much time as possible with your bird. Install the cage in a place where he will see you and you can talk to him (while avoiding the kitchen). Install a perch to your height so your bird can follow you. Avoid leaving it perched on your shoulder. Teach him basic commands (left, up, talking, etc.).

What to do if you ‘catch’ your bird pecking?

1- Ignore the  unwanted behavior. The fact of going to the bird when he pulls feathers tells him that he will have your attention if he keeps this pecking behavior. Reprimand is never a good option because it will increase the level of anxiety.

2- Divert his attention. Have him execute a command (e.g, rise, take an object, etc.).

3- Monitor his condition. If you notice the appearance of sores, promptly contact your veterinarian.

Pecking is a problem that can sometimes be frustrating for a bird owner. You must first be patient and optimistic. In some birds, it will take a long time to solve the problem. The more the situation is chronic, the harder it is to deal with, so it is important to consult your veterinarian promptly.

Ideas to enrich the environment of your bird can be found at http://foragingforparrots.com

A DVD (Captive foraging)  is available to rent at the clinic.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Christmas tree and your companions! Words of caution by veterinarians of Lachine

Veterinarians of Lachine would like to share some recommendations.

What’s more interesting for a cat, a dog, a ferret, rabbit and even a bird than a pretty and sparkling tree full of decorations?

Veterinarians of Lachine suggest you take a few precautions to avoid spending part of your holiday vacation at the vet!

What's more interesting for a cat, a dog, a ferret, rabbit and even a bird than a pretty and sparkling tree full of decorations?

What’s more interesting for a cat, a dog, a ferret, rabbit and even a bird than a pretty and sparkling tree full of decorations?

Solidify your tree:

Install your tree in a corner, ideally away from any object that could help your companion climb the tree. Make sure it is secure and solid!

Add a fortress

You can also add an enclosure or fence around your tree, although not very aesthetic, this is very effective. Another alternative, especially interesting and effective for cats is to use the Ssscat® by Multivet. This device has a motion detector that alerts your companion if he approaches a forbidden zone. If he decides to come closer, the device sends a odorless jet of air towards your companion.

Beware of decorations:

Veterinarians of Lachine suggest you avoid putting decorations at the bottom of the tree, to tame temptations. Same thing with Christmas lights, your companions might chew electrical cords. Here are some things to avoid:

– Tinsel decorations: If ingested they can cause serious problems.

– Glass christmas ornaments: Prefer shatterproof or wood ornaments

– Electrical Wires: Conceal the wires around your tree.

– Small ornaments: that can easily be ingested.

– Wires or ribbons: Can cause the same problems as the tinsel.

– Hooks: Make sure they are secure and that the ornaments are securely fastened.

– Standing water: If you have a real tree, make sure that the water container is out of reach of your companions.

Monitoring is required:

Observe your companions during the first few hours after putting your tree up. Make any necessary adjustments if you discover some flaws in your fortress! Prevention is the key, that way you’ll spend a safe holiday season.

You have other trick or idea? Please contact us!

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Bird Nutrition

Seeds are good for treats and training aids, but not as staple food. They are relatively high in fat and low in essential vitamins and minerals such as vitamins A and D, calcium, and certain amino acids.

Birds who eat well are healthier, live longer, have higher activity levels, and enjoy better plumage than birds that eat a poor diet.

The core of a pet bird’s diet (approximately 80% of the food consumed) should be a good commercial pellet, complemented with vegetables and a small amount of fruit.

  • dark leafy greens (broccoli, kale, dandelions, and spinach)
  • carrots and yams
  • frozen vegetables
  • citrus and kiwis

Less than 10% of total amount eaten daily of:

  • healthily prepared pasta
  • beans
  • eggs
  • brown rice
  • pine nuts
  • unsalted nuts such as almonds, Brazil nuts and walnuts (beware of the high fat content of most nuts)

    Foods to Avoid

    • chocolate
    • avocado
    • alcohol
    • caffeine
    • onions and garlic (small amount may be safe, but best avoided)
    • dairy (yogurt and hard cheese are okay in small amounts)
    • peanuts as well as processed, salty, fatty or sugary foods.
    • Fresh fruits and vegetables should be thoroughly washed, to reduce the risk of infection with bacteria such as E. coli or Salmonella.
      In the wild, birds spend many hours seeking food and water, and interacting with members of the flock. In our homes they usually spend very

      little time looking for food, and often their flock members (humans) are out of the house for many hours of the day.

      You should work towards incorporating captive foraging into your bird’s life. In this process, birds have to work for their food via the use of various homemade and commercial foraging toys. This will increase the bird’s active time during the day and decrease the risk of certain behavioural problems.

      Supplementation is unnecessary, and may be dangerous, for birds whose base food is a balanced and fortified pellet; it is yet another reason to work towards converting your bird to a pelleted diet.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Animal health week from September 28 to October 4, 2014

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) would like to recognize Animal Health Week by drawing attention to the important role played by veterinarians in keeping animals, and, in turn, humans, healthy through the appropriate use of antibiotics.

For more information visit this link!

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

To Reward or to punish? Let the veterinarians of Lachine explain!

Education according to veterinarians of Lachine.

We are always surprised that in 2014, many pet owners still quickly punish their animals but are reluctant to reward them.

It is even proven that when training a dog, cat or bird,  the rewards are much more effective than punishment.

It is even proven that when training a dog, cat or bird, the rewards are much more effective than punishment.

As if offering a reward was  “spoiling” your animal, much like you can spoil a  child. It is not! It is even proven that when training a dog, cat or bird,  the rewards are much more effective than punishment. Many questioned the type of reward that should be awarded: petting or treats, but all agree that we should not hesitate to reward the animal.

The veterinarians of Lachine ask the following question: when learning, is it possible to properly punish your pet? In case you are not sure how to punish, it is better not to do it, and simply to reward positive behavior.

Timing is  critical when it comes to rewards or punishments. Here’s an example. Suppose you have a new puppy and you train cleanliness. You go out with him outside, you tell him to do his business and by chance he runs. It was at that exact time that he should be rewarded: good dog, a hug or a treat, or better yet all three! The animal must associate the act that is asked of him, or any other desired behavior with the positive reinforcement of the reward. By cons, if your puppy has a small ‘accident’ in the house and you have not caught him in the act, simply ignore the incident. To be successful, it must be surprised, not scared, in the act. The intensity should be adequate without exaggeration. The veterinary of Lachine note that very few people use the correction properly. Any punishment should only be done if we can surprise the animal in the act (first 30 seconds of the beginning of the sequence of behavior). One must make a sound that will surprise and interrupt. Any punishment carried out later teaches the animal to hide before performing the behavior in question. The noise needs to be just enough to stop the behavior without terrifying the pet. When possible, make a noise that will surprise him without knowing where it came from.

If you can not surprise the animal each time he makes his misbehavior, the punishment does not work. The veterinarians of Lachine will give you another example to illustrate their point. We were all at least once, ticketed for speeding in our lives. And we were punished for that behavior. However, we must admit that we sometimes still exceed the speed limit allowed when we drive. What for? Just because we know we won’t get ticketed every time. If we would be punished whenever we exceeded the speed limit, it is likely that we would drive more carefully … So, when training your pet, use mostly positive reinforcement: reward desired behaviors and ignore the unwanted behavior.

By the way, during training, the veterinarians of Lachine explain that there is a simple technique to use the awards successfully and not to become a slave. This is also the main argument of people who are against the rewards. The golden rule is that in early learning a given a reward (it can be a caress, but we prefer a little tidbit of food  loved by the animal) whenever the animal does the behavior desired. Sitting still, etc. Once the animal has understood the command, you should start giving rewards randomly (half the time, 2 out of three, once every four events …) and in the long run, it prevents giving the reward mechanically.

You see, it’s simple. But if you need more advice, do not hesitate to talk with the veterinarians of Lachine! Until next time pet owners: punish little and reward much.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.