Category Archives: Dog

FRUITS AND VEGGIES : WHAT IS SAFE AND WHAT ISN’T FOR OUR DOGS.

INTRODUCTION

Several foods that we found in our fridges and pantries should never be given to our dogs. On the other hand, many familiar foods can be offered to them. What are they? That’s what we’re going to see today.

This blog will mainly focus on dogs, as they are most likely to eat all sorts of things, not to say anything! But when that is indicated, we will make a note regarding the food that should not be given to our cats, rabbits and birds.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

WARNING!

Beware, it is not because we recommend a fruit or a vegetable, that one must exaggerate in the quantity to give.  We are talking here about small pieces, mainly given as treats.

In some cases, we can give a little more, we will see.

Moreover, not all dogs are equal. Some will not tolerate certain fruits or vegetables, as they will cause vomiting. If this is the case, please abstain from giving those to your pet.berries-blueberries-raspberries-fruit-122442

So if we do not cause an imbalance in the diet of our dogs, the amount of vegetables and fruits should be less than 10% of its total diet. Moreover, at this amount, the risks of causing urinary problems in certain dogs predisposed to make stones in the bladder are almost nonexistent.

However, there may be restrictions if your dog is suffering from certain diseases, so talk to your veterinarian.

Popular fruits and vegetables that do not present problems:

-FRUITS

APPLES

OK. Apples are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, as well as fiber. They are low in protein and fat, making it a good treat for older dogs. Do not give the core because of the risk of suffocation.

BANANAS

Ok. But in very small quantities, because they are quite caloric.

Pieces of dried bananas can be given as treats for rabbits.

OK for birds, but in very small quantity.

WATERMELON

Ok. Very popular during summertime , small pieces can be given, but the bark and seeds must be removed.

OK for the birds.

SMALL FRUITS (Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)

Ok. In moderation for raspberries and strawberries because of the sugar. It is essential to wash the berries well before offering them.

Dehydrated strawberries can be offered sparingly to rabbits as a treat.

ORANGES AND CLEMENTINES

Ok. Without the skin and seeds.

Citrus fruits are excellent fruits to offer your birds

KIWI

Ok. Without the skin.

This is the best fruit to offer to your birds and guinea pigs (because of high content in Vitamin C).

-VEGETABLES

BROCCOLI

Ok. But in small quantities, as they may cause vomiting due to the isothiocyanates they contain, which may cause gastric irritation.

CUCUMBER AND CELERY

Ok. Very low in calories.

CARROTS

Ok. With moderation because of their sugar content.

TOMATO

Ok. IF only the fruit is offered and not the stem that contains solanine, which can be toxic when ingested in large quantities.

GREEN BEANS

OK. In limited quantities. Some dogs prefer them al dente!

Popular fruits and vegetables that should be avoided:

-FRUITS

GRAPES (and red currants)

NO! Grapes can cause acute kidney failure.

All types of products containing grapes or raisins (including grape juice, mixtures of nuts and dry fruits, bagels, etc.) can cause kidney failure. Even organic, pesticide-free, grapes grown in domestic gardens can cause toxicity. Although the mechanism of action is not clearly understood, these fruits may lead to anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and potentially severe acute renal failure (which develops several days later). Toxicity is not necessarily dose dependent, and symptoms may occur even with small ingestions.

CHERRIES

No. Even if the fruit itself is not toxic, the leaves, stems and pits are. They contain cyanide. However, the quantities are not high and the cores must be ground to release the toxic precursors.

Then, as a precaution, it is better to avoid them.

AVOCADO

No. The pit, skin and avocado leaves contain persin, a toxin that often causes vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. The fruit itself, does not have as much persin as the rest of the plant, but it is still has too much for dogs.

Very toxic to birds and rabbits. So avoid at all cost.

-VEGETABLES

KALE

No.  because very small amounts can cause vomiting in some dogs and we do not know why …

MUSHROOMS

No. Avoid wild mushrooms, there are too many that are toxic. Unless you are an experienced mycologist, be sure to stay clear of them. As for mushrooms sold commercially, white mushrooms would be OK and according to several mycologists, are the only ones that can be eaten raw in a safe way.

Precautionary principle: do not give mushrooms.

ASPARAGUS

No. not because they are toxic. Raw, they are too woody and difficult to chew and cooked, they are soft and have little food interest. This is not the best vegetable.

ONION, GARLIC, LEEK AND CHIVE

No. They may cause gastrointestinal irritation and may lead to red blood cell lesions: anemia.

Although cats are more sensitive, dogs are also at risk if a large amount is consumed. A small occasional dose, such as what can be found in pet foods or treats, will probably not be a problem, but as a precaution, we should not give them to our pets.

MACADAM NUTS

No. Macadam nuts are commonly used in many cookies and sweets. However, they can cause problems for your dog. These nuts can cause weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and fever in dogs. Signs usually appear within 12 hours of ingestion and last about 12 to 48 hours.

Useful links:

Pet Poison Helpline Poison Control Center

http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Do not forget them!

More than 150,000 cats and dogs will soon be moving with their owners. Unfortunately, a few thousands of them will also be abandoned in animal management centers, humane societies, shelters and veterinary clinics. Worse, some will simply be abandoned in homes or thrown to the streets, a situation that is vigorously denounced by the Veterinary Medical Association of Quebec ( small animal practice).

Cats and dogs are sensitive beings  who habits, routine and territory are of major importance. The day they are forced to leave their homes and settle in another environment, it is normal that they feel disturbed and stressed.

Everything must be put in place to minimize the negative effects of such disturbance. To help you better plan your move, the Association of Quebec veterinarians ( small animal practice) offers these tips:

– In the weeks before the move, contact your veterinarian to see if the coverage of your pet is up to date and its preventive medication against the various parasites is in order. If you move to another city, ask for your pet’s medical record. Take the opportunity to ask your former vet to recommend a new vet near your new home. Do not forget to renew your prescription drugs if you have a pet with special needs;thai-cat-1317846_960_720

– Do not forget to prepare a special box for your pet with toys, leash, his bowl, his food, his litter,  and his pillow. A box  that will be easily accessible. Do not take advantage of the move to  throw everything away! Keep objects that will reassure your animal like an old sweater, for example;

– Make sure you have enough food for your dog or cat, especially if it eats a special diet. Also purchase a transport cage, a good collar and a  good quality leash;

– If you believe that the day of big departure may be a bit chaotic, why not book a place immediately (your veterinarian, a pension, friends, family, a neighbor) in order to keep your cat or dog. Thus, you will have no need to worry. Place your pet, one or two day (s) before departure to avoid the hustle of the final preparations;

– Learn the laws of your new location for the number of animals allowed and the different responsibilities you must meet;

– Think of questioning the former owners, of your new home, to see if they had unwanted guests like rodents and or small animals lurking around. Never assume that the apartment is free of undesirable occupants. As a precaution, give your pets preventative treatments against internal and external parasites. Know that the smells of other animals are often persistent and can cause behavioral changes  in cats ( marking territory and not always going in the litter box) Make a good cleaning, especially carpets;

– By kindness, write  a note to the  future owner of your old home to show him that  a cat or dog lived there. They will be less surprised if one day, your dog or cat decides to run away and return to live in his previous home;

– During the move, always use a transport cage for cats and even small dogs;

– Be careful if your dog has a tendency to be anxious. The stress of the changes can cause mood swings and aggressive behavior. Some products available from your veterinarian can help reduce stress and promote adaptation. Do not hesitate to ask for advice;

– Beware of heat stroke, never leave your pet alone in a car or truck;

– Upon arrival, install your animals (especially cats) in a small room not too busy, or keep it in its cage until everything is completed. Make sure that there is no passages where the animal can run away. Scribble a note on the door saying not to let out the animal;

– Pay attention to indigestion or potential poisoning from products lying around or even leftover pizza !!! ;

– Be careful, a new environment can mean dangers of running away. Beware, for example, of open doors,  exhaust air dryer hoses or faulty fences. The animal may  be tempted to return to his former home;

– Some cats can hide and be afraid, while others explore everywhere. Beware of traps that await your pet as window sills, streets, pools, etc. Loss of appetite can also be observed for a few days, be careful and patient. However, if it persists more than 24 or 48 hours, contact a veterinarian. Let your cat or your dog time to tame the surroundings and to establish his little routine;

– Do not forget to put an identification collar and the new municipal medal for your pet to comply with  regulations and thus help find your pet in case he/she runs away. Permanent identification with a microchip is also strongly recommended and if it is already installed, do not forget to change the address in the database. This is your best guarantee for the safe return of your pet;

– In general, dogs are more resistant to removal than cats. Sometimes it’s the neighbors who have less tolerance for dogs than cats. So be aware of this, especially if your dog tends to bark or your cat to wander. Be respectful of the environment in order to establish a good neighborhood. It would also be nice to present them your neighbors to show them ‘what a good pet you have’.

– Make a visit at your new vet to get to know, the hours of operation and services offered, while opening a folder for your pet. Take the opportunity to transfer data from your old medical file and let them inform you about any prevention needs depending on the new environment.

If you practice these recommendations, you should be able to minimize the impact of the move on your pets and together, start a new stage in your life!

Translated from Source: Quebec Veterinary Medical Association in small animal practice

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Dental Cleaning for your Pet

Professional dental cleaning is often indicated when periodontal disease is present. The veterinarians from the Lachine Veterinary Clinic are pleased to provide you with the appropriate information concerning the procedure.

Our own teeth are scaled by a dentist or hygienist – we sit in the chair and open our mouth when requested, letting the professional do their work. While the principles of good oral hygiene and dental health are the same for dogs and cats as for people, there are some significant differences. We understand why the procedure is important, and we typically do not need sedation or restraint. Neither is true for our pets. Another important difference between human and veterinary dental practice is that we tell the dentist when there is discomfort; to ensure that nothing is missed in dogs or cats, our patients require a thorough oral examination as part of a dental scaling procedure. Your veterinary dentist may recommend dental radiographs.animal-dog-pet-dangerous-large

Professional dental cleaning includes scaling and other steps described below.

Every professional dental cleaning starts with a review of the patient’s general health and any previous dental history. For a thorough, safe dental cleaning in veterinary patients, anesthesia is essential, as this permits a comprehensive assessment of the tissues, allows dental radiographs to be made when indicated, followed by the cleaning (scaling and polishing procedure) itself above and below the gum-line.

Non-anesthetic or Anesthesia-free dental scaling” is not recommended by AVDC

http://avdc.org/AFD/

If the extent of the abnormality is limited to accumulation of plaque and dental tartar with gingivitis or only mild periodontitis (bone loss around the tooth), professional dental cleaning is indicated. The veterinary dentist will call the owner if additional abnormalities requiring attention are found.

Professional dental cleaning removes dental plaque and tartar that cause periodontal disease. The dental deposits are removed by power (ultrasonic) and hand dental scalers. Following scaling, the teeth are polished to remove residual plaque and to smooth the tooth surface (which delays deposition of plaque and tartar subsequently). The mouth is rinsed to remove debris prior to a final inspection. The pet owner will be provided with recommendations for daily home oral hygiene specific for dogs or cats, and a recommendation made for a follow-up examination.

Questions? Call us now! 514-634-4190.

American Veterinary Dental College

http://www.avdc.org/careforcats.html

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Online Web Store.

Did you know that you can now enjoy the benefits of home delivery of your pet’s prescription medications and diets, as well as a wide range of non-prescription items? We trust you will enjoy the ease of buying products and prescriptions for your pets on-line and the convenience of having them delivered right to your home. Our experienced and knowledgeable staff is ready to help you find the best health outcomes for your pet and we are committed to extending this service by delivering high quality, veterinarian-approved products right to your door.

Sign in now to re-order your pet products or to check the status of your order.e-commerce-402822_960_720

If you are a registered user, access your account by using the link provided in your re-order reminder email or by entering your login information into our sign-in box on this web page.

If you are new to our web store, please contact us and we will be happy to sign you up. Or click on the link on the left to let us know that you would like to register for a web store password.

Register to My Vet Store

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Fleas

Let’s talk about fleas! All animals that go outside should receive monthly medication to prevent flea infestations  (one medication can be given every 3 months!). Our animals get fleas by frequenting places that are contaminated with flea eggs: your yard, under your balcony … in short, any place in which a stray cat, a skunk or a raccoon can go or get into. In addition to being a major nuisance, fleas can transmit to your pets and mainly to cats , the infamous tapeworm …yikes! Fleas can also transmit a blood parasite in cats called Mycoplasma haemofelis, which causes severe lethargy and anemia (low levels of red blood cells, the cells that carry oxygen throughout the body).friends-1149841_960_720

Fleas reproduce rather quickly, and they prefer to feed on animal blood. However, you are at risk to be bitten if your animal is infested. Flea eggs mature in dark, warm places, such as rugs or cracks in the floor. After maturing into adults, they jump onto your animal, feed, and then reproduce. After laying eggs, the eggs will fall back onto the floor and the cycle begins again. The best way to get rid of fleas is to treat your animal once a month for 6 months. There are many medications available. Once your animal is treated, the fleas start to die off and fall off your animal. The repeated treatments are necessary in order to eliminate all the immature fleas and eggs as well. It is a common myth to restrict your animal to one room in the house in order to contain the fleas. It is more efficient to let your animal roam free, that way the fleas (who are very good at hiding!) will jump on him or her and then die off. If you restrict your pet, the fleas that are hiding in other rooms in the house will have no animal to jump on but you!

If your home is infested with fleas, in addition to treating ALL your pets (if one pet is infested with fleas, then all your pets are considered infested), your home needs to be cleaned thoroughly as well. It is important to vacuum the whole house and wash everything the animal may have come in contact with.

Flea bites on humans tend to appear mostly on places where we touch our animals, and also on the lower legs and feet (fleas cannot jump very high). A good trick to test for fleas in your house is to walk around in white socks. The fleas can sometimes be seen on your socks.

To check your animal for fleas, simply part the fur and take a close look a the skin. The preferred site for fleas is the lower back, but they can be all over the body. An intact adult flea is difficult to catch, but very often we can see the flea’s excrement (flea dirt), which resembles little black dots shaped like a comma. You can rub your animals fur and see the flea dirt drop onto a white sheet of paper. Simply apply a few drops of water onto the dirt and rub it on the paper. If you notice a red streak of blood, this confirms that it is in fact flea dirt.

Prevention is always key. The Veterinarians at Lachine veterinary clinic recommend a monthly preventative for fleas. This can be combined with preventatives for ticks, heartworm and intestinal worms. The preventative is recommended for all dogs and outdoor cats, throughout the spring, summer and fall months from April-November.

Be careful! Certain flea/tick products with permethrin (applied to the skin), which are still on sale, are very toxic to cats and should not be used in a home where dogs and cats live together.

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Intestinal parasites

In the summer months, the most common intestinal worms for dogs are roundworms (Toxocara), hookworms (Ancylostoma), whipworms (Trichuris) and tapeworms (Taenia, Dipylidium). These worms tend to be found in feces that are not picked up and stay stagnant in the grass, allowing the eggs to develop. The most common clinical signs are soft stools, diarrhea and vomiting. In some cases, the worms can be seen with the naked eye. In severe cases with large infestations, the worms can form an embolus and cause an intestinal blockage. However, your dog may not present any clinical signs at all, and he or she may still be shedding the eggs. dog-410948_960_720

The most common intestinal worms for cats are roundworms (Toxocara) and tapeworm (Taenia, Dipylidium). The cats that are most likely affected are cats that go outside and hunt, bringing back mice, birds, squirrels, etc. However, any cat that goes outside, even for a short period of time, can be exposed to these worms. The most common clinical signs are soft stools, diarrhea, occasionally vomiting. In some instances, the worms can be seen with the naked eye. The tapeworm can sometimes be seen around the anus, resembling small grains of rice.

The veterinarians at Clinique Vétérinaire Lachine recommend a monthly preventative for intestinal worms during the warmer months, i.e. from May/June – November. These preventatives can be in pill form, or a liquid to apply on the skin. Occasionally, two preventatives need to be combined. However, since the universal drug that eliminates all parasites does not exist, CAPC also recommends testing the stool of your pet regularly. Four times the first year of life, then twice a year thereafter.

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Ticks

Today we want to talk to you about an arachnid, the tick. In the late 70s, these critters were virtually nonexistent in Quebec. Parasitologists mainly warned us that they did exist, particularly south of the border and on the West Coast. Things have changed! We now know that the tick is responsible for transmitting Lyme disease and can now complete its reproductive cycle in Quebec. More and more dogs are seen in consultation because of ticks.tick-482613_960_720

For those who do not know, the tick feeds on the blood of his victims (mammals, birds, reptiles …), but not like the mosquito. The mosquito bites its victim, gets engorged with blood and leave after the meal is complete. Instead, the tick bites his victim and remains there for a long period of time. Particularly females who need a lot of blood in order to lay up to 3,000 eggs. The mouth parts of the tick are inserted into the skin of the victim and firmly hold the arachnid in place… the tick will not fall easily.

So the big question is… What should you do if you find a tick on our dog?

There is now evidence that the rapid removal of the tick is probably the best way to prevent the transmission of diseases. But the tick has to me removed correctly. Several tools are available for tick removal. Whichever you use, it is important to grasp the tick as close as possible to the skin. Thereafter, pull up with firm pressure, but constant (do not jerk it!). Once removed, it is necessary to clean the wound with disinfectant soap. Chlorhexidine is a good choice. Keep the tick in a dry container for identification.

Do not jerk, crush the tick or use your fingers to remove it. If you use a small pliers, it must be fine enough to capture the mouthparts without crushing the tick. If the mouthparts remain stuck in the skin, infection can occur.

If you have any doubt, give your veterinarian a call.

There are now ,new and safer tablets that prevent tick infestations and fleas in dogs. If ever you live in an environment where ticks are present, we strongly recommend that you administer it to your dog during the tick season, i.e. from April to the end of November. But be careful! Products with permethrin (applied to the skin), which are still on sale, are very toxic to cats and should not be used in a home where dogs and cats live together. This is not the case for the new oral anti-tick and flea product.

Lyme disease is surging in Quebec, veterinarians of Lachine veterinary clinic recommend you test your dog for this disease. This can be done at the same time as its heart worm test.

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.