Category Archives: Rabbit

FRUITS AND VEGGIES : WHAT IS SAFE AND WHAT ISN’T FOR OUR DOGS.

INTRODUCTION

Several foods that we found in our fridges and pantries should never be given to our dogs. On the other hand, many familiar foods can be offered to them. What are they? That’s what we’re going to see today.

This blog will mainly focus on dogs, as they are most likely to eat all sorts of things, not to say anything! But when that is indicated, we will make a note regarding the food that should not be given to our cats, rabbits and birds.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

WARNING!

Beware, it is not because we recommend a fruit or a vegetable, that one must exaggerate in the quantity to give.  We are talking here about small pieces, mainly given as treats.

In some cases, we can give a little more, we will see.

Moreover, not all dogs are equal. Some will not tolerate certain fruits or vegetables, as they will cause vomiting. If this is the case, please abstain from giving those to your pet.berries-blueberries-raspberries-fruit-122442

So if we do not cause an imbalance in the diet of our dogs, the amount of vegetables and fruits should be less than 10% of its total diet. Moreover, at this amount, the risks of causing urinary problems in certain dogs predisposed to make stones in the bladder are almost nonexistent.

However, there may be restrictions if your dog is suffering from certain diseases, so talk to your veterinarian.

Popular fruits and vegetables that do not present problems:

-FRUITS

APPLES

OK. Apples are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, as well as fiber. They are low in protein and fat, making it a good treat for older dogs. Do not give the core because of the risk of suffocation.

BANANAS

Ok. But in very small quantities, because they are quite caloric.

Pieces of dried bananas can be given as treats for rabbits.

OK for birds, but in very small quantity.

WATERMELON

Ok. Very popular during summertime , small pieces can be given, but the bark and seeds must be removed.

OK for the birds.

SMALL FRUITS (Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)

Ok. In moderation for raspberries and strawberries because of the sugar. It is essential to wash the berries well before offering them.

Dehydrated strawberries can be offered sparingly to rabbits as a treat.

ORANGES AND CLEMENTINES

Ok. Without the skin and seeds.

Citrus fruits are excellent fruits to offer your birds

KIWI

Ok. Without the skin.

This is the best fruit to offer to your birds and guinea pigs (because of high content in Vitamin C).

-VEGETABLES

BROCCOLI

Ok. But in small quantities, as they may cause vomiting due to the isothiocyanates they contain, which may cause gastric irritation.

CUCUMBER AND CELERY

Ok. Very low in calories.

CARROTS

Ok. With moderation because of their sugar content.

TOMATO

Ok. IF only the fruit is offered and not the stem that contains solanine, which can be toxic when ingested in large quantities.

GREEN BEANS

OK. In limited quantities. Some dogs prefer them al dente!

Popular fruits and vegetables that should be avoided:

-FRUITS

GRAPES (and red currants)

NO! Grapes can cause acute kidney failure.

All types of products containing grapes or raisins (including grape juice, mixtures of nuts and dry fruits, bagels, etc.) can cause kidney failure. Even organic, pesticide-free, grapes grown in domestic gardens can cause toxicity. Although the mechanism of action is not clearly understood, these fruits may lead to anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and potentially severe acute renal failure (which develops several days later). Toxicity is not necessarily dose dependent, and symptoms may occur even with small ingestions.

CHERRIES

No. Even if the fruit itself is not toxic, the leaves, stems and pits are. They contain cyanide. However, the quantities are not high and the cores must be ground to release the toxic precursors.

Then, as a precaution, it is better to avoid them.

AVOCADO

No. The pit, skin and avocado leaves contain persin, a toxin that often causes vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. The fruit itself, does not have as much persin as the rest of the plant, but it is still has too much for dogs.

Very toxic to birds and rabbits. So avoid at all cost.

-VEGETABLES

KALE

No.  because very small amounts can cause vomiting in some dogs and we do not know why …

MUSHROOMS

No. Avoid wild mushrooms, there are too many that are toxic. Unless you are an experienced mycologist, be sure to stay clear of them. As for mushrooms sold commercially, white mushrooms would be OK and according to several mycologists, are the only ones that can be eaten raw in a safe way.

Precautionary principle: do not give mushrooms.

ASPARAGUS

No. not because they are toxic. Raw, they are too woody and difficult to chew and cooked, they are soft and have little food interest. This is not the best vegetable.

ONION, GARLIC, LEEK AND CHIVE

No. They may cause gastrointestinal irritation and may lead to red blood cell lesions: anemia.

Although cats are more sensitive, dogs are also at risk if a large amount is consumed. A small occasional dose, such as what can be found in pet foods or treats, will probably not be a problem, but as a precaution, we should not give them to our pets.

MACADAM NUTS

No. Macadam nuts are commonly used in many cookies and sweets. However, they can cause problems for your dog. These nuts can cause weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and fever in dogs. Signs usually appear within 12 hours of ingestion and last about 12 to 48 hours.

Useful links:

Pet Poison Helpline Poison Control Center

http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Rabbit dental care

 

Does your rabbit need orthodontic care? As curious as it may seem, dental malocclusion in rabbits is an important problem and is often under diagnosed.

The poor apposition of the teeth is one of the main causes of the loss of appetite in rabbits.

The origins of the malocclusion are multiple. We speak mainly of genetic causes, traumas and dental abscesses.animal-1846462_960_720

The diet of rabbits is very abrasive, which has the effect of wearing the teeth during chewing. To compensate for this wear, the teeth of rabbits grow continuously. The molars are aligned so that the wear surfaces are flat with sharp edges, allowing effective chewing of fibre. The teeth must be properly aligned to allow for proper wear of maxillary and mandibular teeth.

Rabbits with malocclusion usually exhibit excessive drooling, appetite and weight loss. Anorexia is frequently progressive. First, the animal stops eating its pellets, then its hay, then, finally its vegetables. Often the animal seems interested in its food. He even goes to put food in his mouth, to drop it shortly after. Owners often mention that these rabbits grind their teeth.

Loss of appetite should be addressed promptly in rabbits, because if it persists too long, it can become lethal.

To make a precise diagnosis, your veterinarian will often have to put your rabbit under anesthesia, especially if his mouth is full of saliva and a problem in the back teeth is suspected.

Depending on the type of problem, its origin and its location, treatments will be suggested. Some advanced cases can sometimes be relieved, but cannot be cured permanently. Some rabbits will require regular visits to their veterinarian.

So the best solution is prevention. Offer a rich fibre diet containing a large amount of hay, ideally Timothy as well as good leafy green vegetables.

Where possible, acquire the rabbit from a breeder who is known to produce animals free from malocclusion. And finally, after buying the rabbit, have it checked immediately by your veterinarian to make sure it is free from birth defects and infections.

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Online Web Store.

Did you know that you can now enjoy the benefits of home delivery of your pet’s prescription medications and diets, as well as a wide range of non-prescription items? We trust you will enjoy the ease of buying products and prescriptions for your pets on-line and the convenience of having them delivered right to your home. Our experienced and knowledgeable staff is ready to help you find the best health outcomes for your pet and we are committed to extending this service by delivering high quality, veterinarian-approved products right to your door.

Sign in now to re-order your pet products or to check the status of your order.e-commerce-402822_960_720

If you are a registered user, access your account by using the link provided in your re-order reminder email or by entering your login information into our sign-in box on this web page.

If you are new to our web store, please contact us and we will be happy to sign you up. Or click on the link on the left to let us know that you would like to register for a web store password.

Register to My Vet Store

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

The return of ticks (Updated)

The nice weather has returned, well almost … and so are some of the inconveniences of summer.

Today we want to talk to you about an arachnid, the tick. In the late 70s, these critters were virtually nonexistent in Quebec. Parasitologists mainly warned us that they did exist, particularly south of the border and on the west coast. Things have changed! We now know that the tick is responsible for transmitting Lyme disease and can now complete its reproductive cycle in Quebec. More and more dogs are seen in consultation because of ticks.

Tick found on one of our patients.

Tick found on one of our patients.

For those who do not know, the tick feeds on the blood of his victims (mammals, birds, reptiles …), but not like the mosquito. The mosquito bites its victim, gets engorged with blood and leave after the meal is complete. Instead, the tick bites his victim and remains there for a long period of time. Particularly females who need a lot of blood in order to lay up to 3,000 eggs. The mouthparts of the tick are inserted into the skin of the victim and firmly hold the arachnid in place… the tick will not fall easily.

So the big question is… What should you do if you find a tick on our dog?

There is now evidence that the rapid removal of the tick is probably the best way to prevent the transmission of diseases. But the tick has to me removed correctly. Several tools are available for tick removal. Whichever you use, it is important to grasp the tick as close as possible to the skin. Thereafter, pull up with firm pressure, but constant (do not jerk it!). Once removed, it is necessary to clean the wound with disinfectant soap. Chlorhexidine is a good choice. Keep the tick in a dry container for identification.

Do not jerk, crush the tick or use your fingers to remove it. If you use a small pliers, it must be fine enough to capture the mouthparts without crushing the tick. If the mouthparts remain stuck in the skin, infection can occur.

If you have any doubt, give your veterinarian a call.

There are now ,new and safer tablets that prevent tick infestations and fleas in dogs. If ever you live in an environment where ticks are present, we strongly recommend that you  administer it to your dog during the tick season, ie from June to the end of November. But be careful! Products with permethrin (applied to the skin), which are still on sale, are very toxic to cats and should not be used in a home where dogs and cats live together. This is not the case for the new oral anti-tick and fleas product.

Lyme disease is surging in Quebec, veterinarians of Lachine veterinary clinic recommend you  test  your dog for this disease. This can be done at the same time as its heart worm test.

In conclusion, veterinarians of Lachine veterinary clinic recommend treating your dogs preventively against heart worm, intestinal parasites, fleas and ticks, and your outdoor cats against heart worm, intestinal parasites and fleas, at least once a month, from June to November inclusively.

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team at the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Christmas tree and your companions! Words of caution by veterinarians of Lachine

Veterinarians of Lachine would like to share some recommendations.

What’s more interesting for a cat, a dog, a ferret, rabbit and even a bird than a pretty and sparkling tree full of decorations?

Veterinarians of Lachine suggest you take a few precautions to avoid spending part of your holiday vacation at the vet!

What's more interesting for a cat, a dog, a ferret, rabbit and even a bird than a pretty and sparkling tree full of decorations?

What’s more interesting for a cat, a dog, a ferret, rabbit and even a bird than a pretty and sparkling tree full of decorations?

Solidify your tree:

Install your tree in a corner, ideally away from any object that could help your companion climb the tree. Make sure it is secure and solid!

Add a fortress

You can also add an enclosure or fence around your tree, although not very aesthetic, this is very effective. Another alternative, especially interesting and effective for cats is to use the Ssscat® by Multivet. This device has a motion detector that alerts your companion if he approaches a forbidden zone. If he decides to come closer, the device sends a odorless jet of air towards your companion.

Beware of decorations:

Veterinarians of Lachine suggest you avoid putting decorations at the bottom of the tree, to tame temptations. Same thing with Christmas lights, your companions might chew electrical cords. Here are some things to avoid:

– Tinsel decorations: If ingested they can cause serious problems.

– Glass christmas ornaments: Prefer shatterproof or wood ornaments

– Electrical Wires: Conceal the wires around your tree.

– Small ornaments: that can easily be ingested.

– Wires or ribbons: Can cause the same problems as the tinsel.

– Hooks: Make sure they are secure and that the ornaments are securely fastened.

– Standing water: If you have a real tree, make sure that the water container is out of reach of your companions.

Monitoring is required:

Observe your companions during the first few hours after putting your tree up. Make any necessary adjustments if you discover some flaws in your fortress! Prevention is the key, that way you’ll spend a safe holiday season.

You have other trick or idea? Please contact us!

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Feeding your rabbits

Recommendations of Lachine veterinay clinic about rabbits nutrition.

Rabbits have a delicate digestive system and unique dentition, so be sure to provide them with a healthy and balanced diet starting at a very young age. This will greatly help to prevent certain health problems such as urinary stones and dental and digestive problems. Here’s what the veterinarians Lachine veterinary clinic recommends:

Rabbits have a delicate digestive system and unique dentition, so be sure to provide them with a healthy and balanced diet starting at a very young age.

Rabbits have a delicate digestive system and unique dentition, so be sure to provide them with a healthy and balanced diet starting at a very young age.

A good quality hay should be offered at will. In addition to being an excellent source of fiber, which is essential to good digestive health, hay allows the rabbit’s teeth to wear properly. Remember to avoid sticks and branches of apple trees. Prefer millet hay and oat hay to alfalfa because they are lower in calories and calcium. Excess calcium can cause kidney and urinary problems (sand, pebbles and even calculations).

You can offer your pet a rich quality of fiber molded  pellets (25%), but in small quantities:

-For dwarf rabbits, you can offer them two ounces per day (60 ml).

-For standard rabbits, you can offer them 3-4 ounces per day (90-120 ml).

The rabbitt pellets are usually composed of extruded hay, which means that if your rabbit eats hay of good  quality and quantity,pellets can be excluded from the diet. Avoid any mixture of grains, dried fruits and colored grains.

Give your rabbit a variety of vegetables daily. Vegetables such as romaine, Boston lettuce, bok choy, endive, parsley, herbs, heads carrots, dandelion,  watercress, etc. Spinach should be given in small quantities given its high content of calcium. Same thing for broccoli. As for fruits, the amount of fruit  given should be very limited and occasional (1-2 times per week). As treats, you can give blueberries, bananas, strawberries, apples and raspberries.

Avoid dairy  treats ,dairy based supplements ,vitamins and minerals.

The veterinarians of Lachine veterinary clinic reminds you that any changes to your pet’s diet must be done very gradually. If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact us.

Animal health week from September 28 to October 4, 2014

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) would like to recognize Animal Health Week by drawing attention to the important role played by veterinarians in keeping animals, and, in turn, humans, healthy through the appropriate use of antibiotics.

For more information visit this link!

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.