Tag Archives: lachine veterinary clinic

FRUITS AND VEGGIES : WHAT IS SAFE AND WHAT ISN’T FOR OUR DOGS.

INTRODUCTION

Several foods that we found in our fridges and pantries should never be given to our dogs. On the other hand, many familiar foods can be offered to them. What are they? That’s what we’re going to see today.

This blog will mainly focus on dogs, as they are most likely to eat all sorts of things, not to say anything! But when that is indicated, we will make a note regarding the food that should not be given to our cats, rabbits and birds.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

WARNING!

Beware, it is not because we recommend a fruit or a vegetable, that one must exaggerate in the quantity to give.  We are talking here about small pieces, mainly given as treats.

In some cases, we can give a little more, we will see.

Moreover, not all dogs are equal. Some will not tolerate certain fruits or vegetables, as they will cause vomiting. If this is the case, please abstain from giving those to your pet.berries-blueberries-raspberries-fruit-122442

So if we do not cause an imbalance in the diet of our dogs, the amount of vegetables and fruits should be less than 10% of its total diet. Moreover, at this amount, the risks of causing urinary problems in certain dogs predisposed to make stones in the bladder are almost nonexistent.

However, there may be restrictions if your dog is suffering from certain diseases, so talk to your veterinarian.

Popular fruits and vegetables that do not present problems:

-FRUITS

APPLES

OK. Apples are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, as well as fiber. They are low in protein and fat, making it a good treat for older dogs. Do not give the core because of the risk of suffocation.

BANANAS

Ok. But in very small quantities, because they are quite caloric.

Pieces of dried bananas can be given as treats for rabbits.

OK for birds, but in very small quantity.

WATERMELON

Ok. Very popular during summertime , small pieces can be given, but the bark and seeds must be removed.

OK for the birds.

SMALL FRUITS (Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)

Ok. In moderation for raspberries and strawberries because of the sugar. It is essential to wash the berries well before offering them.

Dehydrated strawberries can be offered sparingly to rabbits as a treat.

ORANGES AND CLEMENTINES

Ok. Without the skin and seeds.

Citrus fruits are excellent fruits to offer your birds

KIWI

Ok. Without the skin.

This is the best fruit to offer to your birds and guinea pigs (because of high content in Vitamin C).

-VEGETABLES

BROCCOLI

Ok. But in small quantities, as they may cause vomiting due to the isothiocyanates they contain, which may cause gastric irritation.

CUCUMBER AND CELERY

Ok. Very low in calories.

CARROTS

Ok. With moderation because of their sugar content.

TOMATO

Ok. IF only the fruit is offered and not the stem that contains solanine, which can be toxic when ingested in large quantities.

GREEN BEANS

OK. In limited quantities. Some dogs prefer them al dente!

Popular fruits and vegetables that should be avoided:

-FRUITS

GRAPES (and red currants)

NO! Grapes can cause acute kidney failure.

All types of products containing grapes or raisins (including grape juice, mixtures of nuts and dry fruits, bagels, etc.) can cause kidney failure. Even organic, pesticide-free, grapes grown in domestic gardens can cause toxicity. Although the mechanism of action is not clearly understood, these fruits may lead to anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and potentially severe acute renal failure (which develops several days later). Toxicity is not necessarily dose dependent, and symptoms may occur even with small ingestions.

CHERRIES

No. Even if the fruit itself is not toxic, the leaves, stems and pits are. They contain cyanide. However, the quantities are not high and the cores must be ground to release the toxic precursors.

Then, as a precaution, it is better to avoid them.

AVOCADO

No. The pit, skin and avocado leaves contain persin, a toxin that often causes vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. The fruit itself, does not have as much persin as the rest of the plant, but it is still has too much for dogs.

Very toxic to birds and rabbits. So avoid at all cost.

-VEGETABLES

KALE

No.  because very small amounts can cause vomiting in some dogs and we do not know why …

MUSHROOMS

No. Avoid wild mushrooms, there are too many that are toxic. Unless you are an experienced mycologist, be sure to stay clear of them. As for mushrooms sold commercially, white mushrooms would be OK and according to several mycologists, are the only ones that can be eaten raw in a safe way.

Precautionary principle: do not give mushrooms.

ASPARAGUS

No. not because they are toxic. Raw, they are too woody and difficult to chew and cooked, they are soft and have little food interest. This is not the best vegetable.

ONION, GARLIC, LEEK AND CHIVE

No. They may cause gastrointestinal irritation and may lead to red blood cell lesions: anemia.

Although cats are more sensitive, dogs are also at risk if a large amount is consumed. A small occasional dose, such as what can be found in pet foods or treats, will probably not be a problem, but as a precaution, we should not give them to our pets.

MACADAM NUTS

No. Macadam nuts are commonly used in many cookies and sweets. However, they can cause problems for your dog. These nuts can cause weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and fever in dogs. Signs usually appear within 12 hours of ingestion and last about 12 to 48 hours.

Useful links:

Pet Poison Helpline Poison Control Center

http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Rabbit dental care

 

Does your rabbit need orthodontic care? As curious as it may seem, dental malocclusion in rabbits is an important problem and is often under diagnosed.

The poor apposition of the teeth is one of the main causes of the loss of appetite in rabbits.

The origins of the malocclusion are multiple. We speak mainly of genetic causes, traumas and dental abscesses.animal-1846462_960_720

The diet of rabbits is very abrasive, which has the effect of wearing the teeth during chewing. To compensate for this wear, the teeth of rabbits grow continuously. The molars are aligned so that the wear surfaces are flat with sharp edges, allowing effective chewing of fibre. The teeth must be properly aligned to allow for proper wear of maxillary and mandibular teeth.

Rabbits with malocclusion usually exhibit excessive drooling, appetite and weight loss. Anorexia is frequently progressive. First, the animal stops eating its pellets, then its hay, then, finally its vegetables. Often the animal seems interested in its food. He even goes to put food in his mouth, to drop it shortly after. Owners often mention that these rabbits grind their teeth.

Loss of appetite should be addressed promptly in rabbits, because if it persists too long, it can become lethal.

To make a precise diagnosis, your veterinarian will often have to put your rabbit under anesthesia, especially if his mouth is full of saliva and a problem in the back teeth is suspected.

Depending on the type of problem, its origin and its location, treatments will be suggested. Some advanced cases can sometimes be relieved, but cannot be cured permanently. Some rabbits will require regular visits to their veterinarian.

So the best solution is prevention. Offer a rich fibre diet containing a large amount of hay, ideally Timothy as well as good leafy green vegetables.

Where possible, acquire the rabbit from a breeder who is known to produce animals free from malocclusion. And finally, after buying the rabbit, have it checked immediately by your veterinarian to make sure it is free from birth defects and infections.

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Inappropriate Elimination in cats

Inappropriate Elimination in cats according to the veterinarians of the Lachine Veterinary Clinic.

When a cat urinates or eliminates stools in the house and out of its litter box, it is never pleasant. This behavior is called inappropriate elimination. And the latter is the most common undesirable behavior encountered with cats.

Causes

The causes of an  inappropriate elimination can be divided in two: medical and non-medical .

Medical causes

In terms of medical causes, veterinarians at the Lachine veterinary clinic immediately think of urinary problems such as cystitis (bladder infection) or the presence of stones in the bladder. These conditions generate a lot of pain and  cats that have them tend to want to urinate very often, but in small amounts wherever they are, every time the pain becomes too intense.

Other diseases such as renal insufficiency, hyperthyroidism and diabetes, to name a few, cause excessive thirst and are associated naturally with frequent urination. Cats with these conditions find it difficult to hold back and sometimes, they urinate outside their tank when they cannot reach them in time.

Some geriatric diseases such as osteoarthritis can also cause inopportune elimination. If the tray is placed on a countertop or in a location that is not easily accessible, the arthritic cat will have greater  difficulty accessing it. Same thing if the walls of the litter box are very high, the cat can then have a lot of difficulty climbing up the litter box and will have no choice but to eliminate elsewhere.

Eventually, diseases of the digestive system such as colitis, intestinal parasites, constipation, blockage or infection of the anal bags, can result in the elimination of stools in the home.

Non-medical causes

Apart from medical causes, the major non-medical causes can be divided into three categories: aversion, preference and marking. In terms of aversion, a cat may not like its tray, the type of litter used, or where it is located. For example, if the tray is placed in the children’s playroom, it is quite possible that the cat hesitates to go to in his box.cat-336270_960_720

The strong odors that sometimes come out of the tank when it is not cleaned often enough, can sometimes discourage the cat from going there also.  Scented litters sometimes can cause the same problem. Finally, some ammonia-based detergents have the unfortunate property of leaving an unpleasant residual odor for cats, who ,let’s not forget, have a much more developed sense of smell than ours and will then avoid going into the box .

The type of litter used may also cause aversion in some cats, whether due to the texture or the inadequate amount of litter in the tray .

The height and style of the litter box can also cause undesirable aversion and elimination. Think of an inferior sized tray, too small for a big cat or conversely far too high for a kitten. Some bins are nowadays fitted with lids and this is not always adequate for some felines.

In terms of preference, it can be said that a cat may prefer one kind over another. It may prefer clumping litter to that made of traditional clay gravel. He may also prefer one place rather than another, especially if the box is in a busy place. In some cases, the texture and cleanliness of some places such as the carpet in the living room, the floor in the dining room, some fabrics such as clothes or plastic may seem more attractive to a cat.

Marking

Finally, marking is a normal behavior in cats, it is their way of leaving their business card, marking their territory or attracting a potential mate. It is however very unpleasant! Unsterilized cats  have a special way of marking: they mainly make it standing up, allowing small amounts of urine to escape on vertical surfaces. Some cats and sterilized cats will mark their territory by urinating on certain objects belonging to the owner. With these animals, this type of tagging is often associated with the presence of outside cats. It can also be a manifestation of anxiety in some cats . Note that the incidence of this type of marking increases with the number of cats living under one roof. One study reported a 100% chance in families with 10 or more cats.

Treatment

Let’s see how to fix the problem.

No punishment!

In the first place, you must make sure that your cat does not suffer from a medical problem. You should therefore consult the veterinarians of the Lachine Veterinary Clinic.

It is essential to clean the soiled areas. We strongly recommend using products that will completely neutralize odors ,not masking products like certain fragrances. For more information, please contact us. You can also cover the areas soiled with a thick plastic. This can have the effect of discouraging the cat from eliminating on the covered location.

If it is an inopportune elimination related to the aversion phenomenon, you must carry out an impeccable maintenance of the tank: remove urine and feces as they appear. If you choose clumping litter, in addition to removing stools, you should remove the agglomerated urine pellets daily and change the litter once a week. When cleaning the tray, do not forget to use ammonia or bleach cleaners.

It is important to provide the cat with an inopportune elimination problem,  a good variety of bins and litters. Offer different models of different sizes.

Another good idea is to place bins in the places chosen by the cat. You can then move these containers to a more convenient location very gradually.

In a family where several cats live, it is also important to identify the culprit: if necessary, you should isolate the cats ,one by one for a short period of time, in a room. Also, remember that you should have at least one litter box per cat living under one roof, plus another , and up to five. So, in a family where four cats live, we should find five clean litter boxes!

Sterilization is effective in 90% of males and 95% of females to regulate  inappropriate eliminations .

In regards to sterilized cats that are marking; attempts should be made to limit the ability of house cats to view outside cats and ,when possible, to get rid of these cats . You must block visual access through windows and doors. You can also lock the cat in a room where he cannot see the outside cats. In some cases, motion sensors or fences can keep some outdoor cats out of the yard and away from the windows.

A behavioral consultation with a veterinarian is always indicated. Sometimes some medication may be prescribed to correct the problem when environmental changes or sterilization have not been effective. Talk to veterinarians at the Lachine Veterinary Clinic.

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Dental Cleaning for your Pet

Professional dental cleaning is often indicated when periodontal disease is present. The veterinarians from the Lachine Veterinary Clinic are pleased to provide you with the appropriate information concerning the procedure.

Our own teeth are scaled by a dentist or hygienist – we sit in the chair and open our mouth when requested, letting the professional do their work. While the principles of good oral hygiene and dental health are the same for dogs and cats as for people, there are some significant differences. We understand why the procedure is important, and we typically do not need sedation or restraint. Neither is true for our pets. Another important difference between human and veterinary dental practice is that we tell the dentist when there is discomfort; to ensure that nothing is missed in dogs or cats, our patients require a thorough oral examination as part of a dental scaling procedure. Your veterinary dentist may recommend dental radiographs.animal-dog-pet-dangerous-large

Professional dental cleaning includes scaling and other steps described below.

Every professional dental cleaning starts with a review of the patient’s general health and any previous dental history. For a thorough, safe dental cleaning in veterinary patients, anesthesia is essential, as this permits a comprehensive assessment of the tissues, allows dental radiographs to be made when indicated, followed by the cleaning (scaling and polishing procedure) itself above and below the gum-line.

Non-anesthetic or Anesthesia-free dental scaling” is not recommended by AVDC

http://avdc.org/AFD/

If the extent of the abnormality is limited to accumulation of plaque and dental tartar with gingivitis or only mild periodontitis (bone loss around the tooth), professional dental cleaning is indicated. The veterinary dentist will call the owner if additional abnormalities requiring attention are found.

Professional dental cleaning removes dental plaque and tartar that cause periodontal disease. The dental deposits are removed by power (ultrasonic) and hand dental scalers. Following scaling, the teeth are polished to remove residual plaque and to smooth the tooth surface (which delays deposition of plaque and tartar subsequently). The mouth is rinsed to remove debris prior to a final inspection. The pet owner will be provided with recommendations for daily home oral hygiene specific for dogs or cats, and a recommendation made for a follow-up examination.

Questions? Call us now! 514-634-4190.

American Veterinary Dental College

http://www.avdc.org/careforcats.html

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Home dental care for Cats

The Lachine Veterinary Clinic veterinarians inform you on home dental cares for your cats.

Home oral hygiene can make a tremendous difference in your cat’s comfort and health. A wide variety of home oral hygiene options are available, but keep in mind that anything you can do to help prevent plaque and tartar accumulation will pay big dividends. What really matters is whether or not home oral hygiene was provided over the long haul – considerable effort applied only for a short period or only occasionally will be of no long-term benefit.

Below are listed some common forms of home oral hygiene that have been proven to be of benefit for cats. Combining several methods will achieve the best results. All methods of home oral hygiene share the goal of preventing or controlling periodontal disease by minimizing plaque (bacterial film) accumulation, and preventing the mineralization of the plaque to form dental tartar. Cats can be reluctant to accept home oral hygiene, and require a very gradual, gentle and patient approach to achieve success.cat teeth

Brushing your cat’s teeth is the single most effective means to maintain dental health between professional dental cleanings. This makes sense because the bacterial film known as “plaque” is the cause of periodontal disease. This film is easily disrupted by the simple mechanical effect of brushing the teeth. For brushing to be effective, it needs to be done several times each week – daily brushing is best. Most cats will allow their teeth to be brushed, but you need to take a very gradual and gentle approach. Start by letting your cat lick the dentifrice from your finger, then off the small feline toothbrush, then gradually place the brush in your cat’s mouth and add the brushing motions. Introduction of this process may require daily activity over 1-2 months. We recommend pet-specific dentifrice for cats; these products are safe for cats and come in flavors that cats accept, such as poultry and seafood. Avoid human toothpastes as they often contain abrasives and high-foaming detergents that should not be swallowed or inhaled. Small cat-specific toothbrushes are available. Some cats prefer finger brushes.

Chlorhexidine is the most effective anti-plaque antiseptic. Chlorhexidine binds to the oral tissues and tooth surfaces, and is gradually released into the oral cavity. Chlorhexidine oral rinses or gels are safe for pets and rarely cause problems. The rinse is applied by squirting a small amount inside the cheek on each side of the mouth. The gel is smeared onto the side of the teeth or applied as a tooth-paste on a tooth-brush or finger brush. Many cats object to the taste of this product, while others accept it with no difficulty.

Several dental-specific diets have been shown to be of benefit in retarding accumulation of dental plaque and tartar cats. Some employ a specific kibble design and others include a chemical anti-tartar poly-phosphate ingredient. Although they may be of value, there is little publicly-available information documenting the dental value of chew products for cats.

Unlike dogs, cats are very individualistic in their acceptance of home oral hygiene. Try several options (brushing, finger-brushing, dental rinses or gels, dental diets) to find those techniques and products that your cat best tolerates. Some cats are very particular about new flavors. Patience and a gentle approach will yield the best results.

The Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) Seal of Acceptance is awarded to products that meet or exceed the VOHC standard for retarding accumulation of dental plaque or tartar. A complete listing of products that have been granted the VOHC Seal of Acceptance is available at www.VOHC.org – click the Products Awarded the VOHC Seal link.

Questions? Call us now! 514-634-4190.

American Veterinary Dental College

http://www.avdc.org/careforcats.html

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Fleas

Let’s talk about fleas! All animals that go outside should receive monthly medication to prevent flea infestations  (one medication can be given every 3 months!). Our animals get fleas by frequenting places that are contaminated with flea eggs: your yard, under your balcony … in short, any place in which a stray cat, a skunk or a raccoon can go or get into. In addition to being a major nuisance, fleas can transmit to your pets and mainly to cats , the infamous tapeworm …yikes! Fleas can also transmit a blood parasite in cats called Mycoplasma haemofelis, which causes severe lethargy and anemia (low levels of red blood cells, the cells that carry oxygen throughout the body).friends-1149841_960_720

Fleas reproduce rather quickly, and they prefer to feed on animal blood. However, you are at risk to be bitten if your animal is infested. Flea eggs mature in dark, warm places, such as rugs or cracks in the floor. After maturing into adults, they jump onto your animal, feed, and then reproduce. After laying eggs, the eggs will fall back onto the floor and the cycle begins again. The best way to get rid of fleas is to treat your animal once a month for 6 months. There are many medications available. Once your animal is treated, the fleas start to die off and fall off your animal. The repeated treatments are necessary in order to eliminate all the immature fleas and eggs as well. It is a common myth to restrict your animal to one room in the house in order to contain the fleas. It is more efficient to let your animal roam free, that way the fleas (who are very good at hiding!) will jump on him or her and then die off. If you restrict your pet, the fleas that are hiding in other rooms in the house will have no animal to jump on but you!

If your home is infested with fleas, in addition to treating ALL your pets (if one pet is infested with fleas, then all your pets are considered infested), your home needs to be cleaned thoroughly as well. It is important to vacuum the whole house and wash everything the animal may have come in contact with.

Flea bites on humans tend to appear mostly on places where we touch our animals, and also on the lower legs and feet (fleas cannot jump very high). A good trick to test for fleas in your house is to walk around in white socks. The fleas can sometimes be seen on your socks.

To check your animal for fleas, simply part the fur and take a close look a the skin. The preferred site for fleas is the lower back, but they can be all over the body. An intact adult flea is difficult to catch, but very often we can see the flea’s excrement (flea dirt), which resembles little black dots shaped like a comma. You can rub your animals fur and see the flea dirt drop onto a white sheet of paper. Simply apply a few drops of water onto the dirt and rub it on the paper. If you notice a red streak of blood, this confirms that it is in fact flea dirt.

Prevention is always key. The Veterinarians at Lachine veterinary clinic recommend a monthly preventative for fleas. This can be combined with preventatives for ticks, heartworm and intestinal worms. The preventative is recommended for all dogs and outdoor cats, throughout the spring, summer and fall months from April-November.

Be careful! Certain flea/tick products with permethrin (applied to the skin), which are still on sale, are very toxic to cats and should not be used in a home where dogs and cats live together.

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

Intestinal parasites

In the summer months, the most common intestinal worms for dogs are roundworms (Toxocara), hookworms (Ancylostoma), whipworms (Trichuris) and tapeworms (Taenia, Dipylidium). These worms tend to be found in feces that are not picked up and stay stagnant in the grass, allowing the eggs to develop. The most common clinical signs are soft stools, diarrhea and vomiting. In some cases, the worms can be seen with the naked eye. In severe cases with large infestations, the worms can form an embolus and cause an intestinal blockage. However, your dog may not present any clinical signs at all, and he or she may still be shedding the eggs. dog-410948_960_720

The most common intestinal worms for cats are roundworms (Toxocara) and tapeworm (Taenia, Dipylidium). The cats that are most likely affected are cats that go outside and hunt, bringing back mice, birds, squirrels, etc. However, any cat that goes outside, even for a short period of time, can be exposed to these worms. The most common clinical signs are soft stools, diarrhea, occasionally vomiting. In some instances, the worms can be seen with the naked eye. The tapeworm can sometimes be seen around the anus, resembling small grains of rice.

The veterinarians at Clinique Vétérinaire Lachine recommend a monthly preventative for intestinal worms during the warmer months, i.e. from May/June – November. These preventatives can be in pill form, or a liquid to apply on the skin. Occasionally, two preventatives need to be combined. However, since the universal drug that eliminates all parasites does not exist, CAPC also recommends testing the stool of your pet regularly. Four times the first year of life, then twice a year thereafter.

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.