Tag Archives: safe

SWIMMING WITH DOGS DURING SUMMER

INTRODUCTION

Summer is here and it means summer vacations. Many dog ​​owners will bring their companion with them. Many will have as destination, a resort area with a lake or even a beach. Other lucky ones, will enjoy the family pool.
Can swimming in open water or in swimming pools cause health problems for dogs?

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

Not all dogs are as skilled in the water and many are not good swimmers.
• Ex .: Dachshund (dog sausage) and the Bulldogs. Dachshunds have very small legs, which does not allow them to have optimal swimming.
Not all dogs will necessarily like to swim, so you sometimes have to get used to them gradually, using positive reinforcement.

Some brachycephalic breeds (flat nose, partially obstructed airways) have more difficulty coping with swimming.
• Ex .: English bulldog, pug.

Flotation Jackets:
• They are essential if your dog accompanies you by boat, whether in a lake or on the sea.
• They are particularly important for certain dog breeds that are not known to be good swimmers: short-nosed breeds, English and French Bulldogs, Pekinese, pugs …
• Even for good swimmers, an accident can occur in the middle of the night or even in daylight if the body of water is agitated.
• Be careful when the water is very cold, like in many rivers in the Laurentians. Dogs that stay too long may suffer from hypothermia and drowning may occur.
• Flotation jackets are essential for rivers, especially if the current is powerful.

FRESH WATER (LAKES AND RIVERS)

Blue algae
Especially observed later in the summer ,when it gets very hot and water levels drop. Ingestion of these algae can be toxic or even fatal for dogs who drink contaminated water.
You should always have water to drink for your dog. The better he is hydrated, the less he will feel the need to drink water from the lake or the river.

Bacteria
There are often surface bacteria in the lakes ,in very hot weather, bacteria can make our dogs sick (eg faecal coliforms).
Most provinces have websites that allow people to check the quality levels before going for a swim. The Ministry of Sustainable Development, Environment and the Fight Against Climate Change Québec has a website to inform swimmers about the quality of water (the link will be posted on the show’s website).

Otitis
After swimming, it is recommended to clean the animal’s ears with a cleaning solution and to dry the ears well. We use cotton wool.

Rinsing
Whenever possible, it is always a good idea to rinse the dog with fresh water (to remove bacteria and pathogenic algae) and then dry the dog thoroughly.
A dog that stays wet for a long time is predisposed to getting skin infections.
Before leaving the lake, we use towels and we dry as much as possible (so you must pack accordingly) and then complete at home with a hairdryer.

SALT WATER

It takes a lot of fresh water to properly hydrate the animal.
Saltwater consumption causes diarrhea and salt can cause even more severe dehydration.
So you have to prevent the consumption of salt water by offering fresh water to drink. Your dog should be encouraged to drink fresh water as often as possible (at least every 20 minutes), especially during hot weather.
Have “hydration” breaks every 20 minutes.

Post-swim rinse
Everyone who was lucky enough to go to the sea knows it. After a day of swimming, our skin is a bit sticky because of salt and sand. It’s the same for our dogs, so it’s a good idea to rinse your dog at the end of the day and then dry it as I mentioned earlier.

Otitis
Same recommendation as for swimming in fresh water. After swimming, it is recommended to clean the ears with a cleaning solution for the ears of animals and to dry the ears well. We use cotton wool.

POOLS

Consider this ,dogs are not as clean as humans. Some may disagree 🙂 .Long haired breeds often have small debris stuck by their backside area (fecal matter,dirt,urine etc) which can contaminate a pool real fast….especially if those same animals are not treated for parasites. Staying on top of your pool water quality and filtration is a must.5E7CED70-2E59-4113-BA77-F4EEDB004462

That being said, according to Dr. Scott Weese of the University of Guelph, the risks of contamination are quite low. According to him, a dog is much less likely to do his needs in a swimming pool than a young child …
(DVM DVSc DipACVIM is a Veterinary Intern and Microbiologist, Diplomat of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Professor at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, and Microbiologist in Public Health. and zoonoses at the University of Guelph’s Center for Public Health and Zoonoses, and Head of Infection Control at the Ontario Veterinary University Hospital and Canada Research Chair in Zoonotic Diseases) .
Still according to Dr. Weese, one should not let a dog who vomits, has diarrhea or has a skin infection, swim in the family pool.

Chlorine
Specialists mention that it is possible to maintain a good quality of pool water, without exaggerating with the use of chlorine. Water should be tested more often. Be sure to maintain pH levels between 7.2 and 7.6 to maximize chlorine efficiency.
Like us, dogs can be sensitive to chlorine in pool water and can cause conjunctivitis (red eyes, usually transient) and dermatitis (inflammation of the skin).
So again, rinse the dog after swimming.

Pool latters versus stairways
Like with children,dogs can easily fall into pools by accident(like trying to reach a floating toy). Many pools are not equiped with stairways permitting a fallen dog,means to escape which can then lead to potential drownings. One must show his dog how to get out of the pool. No easy task here. Otitis/rincing and drying solutions are the same as mentionned above.

Useful links

Provincial water quality sites

http://www.mddelcc.gouv.qc.ca/eau/recreative/qualite.htm

Dogs and swimming pools
https://www.wormsandgermsblog.com/2009/07/articles/animals/dogs/dogs-and-swimming-pools/

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.

 

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FRUITS AND VEGGIES : WHAT IS SAFE AND WHAT ISN’T FOR OUR DOGS.

INTRODUCTION

Several foods that we found in our fridges and pantries should never be given to our dogs. On the other hand, many familiar foods can be offered to them. What are they? That’s what we’re going to see today.

This blog will mainly focus on dogs, as they are most likely to eat all sorts of things, not to say anything! But when that is indicated, we will make a note regarding the food that should not be given to our cats, rabbits and birds.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

WARNING!

Beware, it is not because we recommend a fruit or a vegetable, that one must exaggerate in the quantity to give.  We are talking here about small pieces, mainly given as treats.

In some cases, we can give a little more, we will see.

Moreover, not all dogs are equal. Some will not tolerate certain fruits or vegetables, as they will cause vomiting. If this is the case, please abstain from giving those to your pet.berries-blueberries-raspberries-fruit-122442

So if we do not cause an imbalance in the diet of our dogs, the amount of vegetables and fruits should be less than 10% of its total diet. Moreover, at this amount, the risks of causing urinary problems in certain dogs predisposed to make stones in the bladder are almost nonexistent.

However, there may be restrictions if your dog is suffering from certain diseases, so talk to your veterinarian.

Popular fruits and vegetables that do not present problems:

-FRUITS

APPLES

OK. Apples are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, as well as fiber. They are low in protein and fat, making it a good treat for older dogs. Do not give the core because of the risk of suffocation.

BANANAS

Ok. But in very small quantities, because they are quite caloric.

Pieces of dried bananas can be given as treats for rabbits.

OK for birds, but in very small quantity.

WATERMELON

Ok. Very popular during summertime , small pieces can be given, but the bark and seeds must be removed.

OK for the birds.

SMALL FRUITS (Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)

Ok. In moderation for raspberries and strawberries because of the sugar. It is essential to wash the berries well before offering them.

Dehydrated strawberries can be offered sparingly to rabbits as a treat.

ORANGES AND CLEMENTINES

Ok. Without the skin and seeds.

Citrus fruits are excellent fruits to offer your birds

KIWI

Ok. Without the skin.

This is the best fruit to offer to your birds and guinea pigs (because of high content in Vitamin C).

-VEGETABLES

BROCCOLI

Ok. But in small quantities, as they may cause vomiting due to the isothiocyanates they contain, which may cause gastric irritation.

CUCUMBER AND CELERY

Ok. Very low in calories.

CARROTS

Ok. With moderation because of their sugar content.

TOMATO

Ok. IF only the fruit is offered and not the stem that contains solanine, which can be toxic when ingested in large quantities.

GREEN BEANS

OK. In limited quantities. Some dogs prefer them al dente!

Popular fruits and vegetables that should be avoided:

-FRUITS

GRAPES (and red currants)

NO! Grapes can cause acute kidney failure.

All types of products containing grapes or raisins (including grape juice, mixtures of nuts and dry fruits, bagels, etc.) can cause kidney failure. Even organic, pesticide-free, grapes grown in domestic gardens can cause toxicity. Although the mechanism of action is not clearly understood, these fruits may lead to anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and potentially severe acute renal failure (which develops several days later). Toxicity is not necessarily dose dependent, and symptoms may occur even with small ingestions.

CHERRIES

No. Even if the fruit itself is not toxic, the leaves, stems and pits are. They contain cyanide. However, the quantities are not high and the cores must be ground to release the toxic precursors.

Then, as a precaution, it is better to avoid them.

AVOCADO

No. The pit, skin and avocado leaves contain persin, a toxin that often causes vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. The fruit itself, does not have as much persin as the rest of the plant, but it is still has too much for dogs.

Very toxic to birds and rabbits. So avoid at all cost.

-VEGETABLES

KALE

No.  because very small amounts can cause vomiting in some dogs and we do not know why …

MUSHROOMS

No. Avoid wild mushrooms, there are too many that are toxic. Unless you are an experienced mycologist, be sure to stay clear of them. As for mushrooms sold commercially, white mushrooms would be OK and according to several mycologists, are the only ones that can be eaten raw in a safe way.

Precautionary principle: do not give mushrooms.

ASPARAGUS

No. not because they are toxic. Raw, they are too woody and difficult to chew and cooked, they are soft and have little food interest. This is not the best vegetable.

ONION, GARLIC, LEEK AND CHIVE

No. They may cause gastrointestinal irritation and may lead to red blood cell lesions: anemia.

Although cats are more sensitive, dogs are also at risk if a large amount is consumed. A small occasional dose, such as what can be found in pet foods or treats, will probably not be a problem, but as a precaution, we should not give them to our pets.

MACADAM NUTS

No. Macadam nuts are commonly used in many cookies and sweets. However, they can cause problems for your dog. These nuts can cause weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and fever in dogs. Signs usually appear within 12 hours of ingestion and last about 12 to 48 hours.

Useful links:

Pet Poison Helpline Poison Control Center

http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/

If you ever have any questions, do not hesitate to contact a member of the medical team of the Clinic (514-634-4190) who will be happy to assist you.

About the clinic: The Lachine Veterinary Clinic offers an unmatched and personalized service to pet owners from Lachine, LaSalle, Dorval and Pointe Claire, but also across the West Island of Montreal (West Island) and Laval, and has done so ,since 1982.